U.S. Military Archbishop tells Congress: DO NOT repeal ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy


 

Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio of the U.S. Archdiocese for the Military Services (right in photo below)  has urged Congress not to repeal the policy banning gays from openly serving in the military.

 

 

In the June 1 statement, the archbishop reiterated church teaching on homosexuality as defined by the Catechism of the Catholic Church. According to the catechism, “homosexual acts are intrinsically disordered” but homosexuals must be “accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided.” 

He said a repeal of the law — which prohibits homosexual activity in the military but eliminates sexual orientation as grounds for dismissal — might have “a negative effect on the role of the chaplain not only in the pulpit, but also in the classroom, in the barracks and in the office.” 

The archbishop, noting that gays already serve in the military, questioned if the repeal would “authorize these individuals to engage in activities considered immoral not only by the Catholic Church, but also by many other religious groups” and if it would cause changes in living conditions. 

The archbishop likened the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy with the ways that alcoholics have benefited from Alcoholics Anonymous. “Like homosexuality, there is rarely a cure,” he said. “There is a control through a process, which is guarded by absolute secrecy.”

 The same old episcopal rhetoric…….

One thought on “U.S. Military Archbishop tells Congress: DO NOT repeal ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy

  1. Such twisted logic: protect the position of the chaplin at the expense of the individual. Same old discrimination – maybe we should make chaplins live and act in secret and see how far they would get.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s